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 Post subject: Warner Brothers
PostPosted: 18 Nov 2011, 03:48 
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Warner was one of the few main studios that didn't license their titles for Criterion in the laserdisc age (or after). If they did, what titles do you think they would have chosen and why? Keep in mind that at that time, they only owned Warner titles from about 1950 on.

My vote is Bonnie & Clyde. Revolutionary film that pointed to the future.
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 Post subject: Re: Warner Brothers
PostPosted: 18 Nov 2011, 03:59 
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Almost certainly Kubrick's and John Boorman's

also Claude Lelouch's Un Homme et Une Femme

Mishima, LD and DVD from Warner is, It was released from the Criterion,too


Last edited by cold_sleeper on 18 Nov 2011, 04:13, edited 2 times in total.
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 Post subject: Re: Warner Brothers
PostPosted: 18 Nov 2011, 04:00 
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The Dirty Harry movies
The Exorcist
Superman
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 Post subject: Re: Warner Brothers
PostPosted: 18 Nov 2011, 04:13 
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cold_sleeper wrote:
Almost certainly Kubrick's and John Boorman's

also Claude Lelouch's Un Homme et Une Femme


It's actually because of Kubrick that made me think about this. Nearly all of his pre-Warner films are on Criterion and I was wondering if Barry Lyndon would have been given their special treatment, would it be considered a classic like his other films. I've never heard of Un Homme et Une Femme. The other reason I wanted to ask the question was to get some ideas of other films to watch, so thank you.
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 Post subject: Re: Warner Brothers
PostPosted: 18 Nov 2011, 04:14 
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elahrairrah wrote:
The Dirty Harry movies
The Exorcist
Superman


I can see The Exorcist, but the Dirty Harry series? Maybe the first one. I didn't even think about Superman, that would have been amazing.
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 Post subject: Re: Warner Brothers
PostPosted: 18 Nov 2011, 04:21 
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Make sure surprises, except for Japan, "a man and a woman" will not be released on LD?
Homme et une femme, Un (1966) [NJEL-11655]
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 Post subject: Re: Warner Brothers
PostPosted: 18 Nov 2011, 18:23 
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I could also see Who's Afraid of Virginia Wolff as a Criterion disc. I bet their supplements would have been great for this game changer.
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 Post subject: Re: Warner Brothers
PostPosted: 19 Nov 2011, 12:40 
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ratkins wrote:
Warner was one of the few main studios that didn't license their titles for Criterion in the laserdisc age (or after). If they did, what titles do you think they would have chosen and why? Keep in mind that at that time, they only owned Warner titles from about 1950 on.

My vote is Bonnie & Clyde. Revolutionary film that pointed to the future.

The cut-off point was July 24, 1948. Warners sold all their pre-'48 films and cartoons to a.a.p. for 21 million. Criterion did release Blade Runner which was co-produced by WB. (Did Criterion get the license from the Ladd Co.?) With that in mind, other possible candidates for a Criterion treatment might have been:

Treasure of the Sierra Madre (1948)
Strangers on a Train (1951)
A Streetcar Named Desire (1951)
Crime Wave (1954)
Dial M for Murder (1954)
The Searchers (1956)
Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966)
Bonnie and Clyde (1967) <-- I agree with your choice
The Wild Bunch (1969)
Performance (1970)
THX-1138 (1971)
McCabe & Mrs. Miller (1971)
Mean Streets (1973)
Dog Day Afternoon (1975)
The Shining (1980)
Altered States (1980)
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 Post subject: Re: Warner Brothers
PostPosted: 19 Nov 2011, 20:05 
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Casablanca was released by Criterion on Laserdisc, wasn't that one originally distributed by Warner Bros.?
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 Post subject: Re: Warner Brothers
PostPosted: 19 Nov 2011, 21:53 
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Casablanca was a Warner production, but was owned by Turner and distributed by MGM/UA at that time. Nearly all pre-1948 Warner films were sold Turner. In 2001/02 Warner bought Turner so now they are back home or at least distributed by Warner again.
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 Post subject: Re: Warner Brothers
PostPosted: 07 Feb 2012, 10:37 
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Superman would have been great to see and Enter the Dragon!.
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 Post subject: Re: Warner Brothers
PostPosted: 07 Mar 2012, 19:03 
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ratkins wrote:
Casablanca was a Warner production, but was owned by Turner and distributed by MGM/UA at that time. Nearly all pre-1948 Warner films were sold Turner. In 2001/02 Warner bought Turner so now they are back home or at least distributed by Warner again.



All the pre-1948 was sold to A.A.P. (Associated Artist Productions). A.A.P. was sold to United Artists in the 70's. UA was bought by MGM in the early 80's. Turner bought MGM in 86, selling the studio but keeping majority of the film library, including the A.A.P. library. Warners bought Turner in the 90's. That's why majority of MGM's films from 1986 to early stuff is owned by Warners.


I would've liked to see Little Shop Of Horrors as a Criterion Release.
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 Post subject: Re: Warner Brothers
PostPosted: 17 Jul 2013, 21:48 
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Great Discussion... I wouldve love to have seen the following WB films get the criterion treatment:

The Color Purple
Lethal Weapon
Caddyshack
Blazing Saddles
The Towering Inferno
Mean Streets
Super Fly
Deliverence
THX 1138
The Wild Bunch
  
 
 Post subject: Re: Warner Brothers
PostPosted: 17 Jul 2013, 22:45 
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I wish Criterion did THX-1138. I can't understand Lucas messing with such a classic like he did with Star Wars and not include the original as if the original is unimportant .
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 Post subject: Re: Warner Brothers
PostPosted: 19 Jul 2013, 19:56 
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It could have been sweet. Here's the thing... I love Criterion, but they can be snooty, pompous asses and are getting worse as the years go by. I would bet money that they would never put out something by George Lucas. On top of that, George would probably never want to share any loot with criterion. Just my opinion.
  
 
 Post subject: Re: Warner Brothers
PostPosted: 18 Aug 2013, 02:09 
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jjhunsecker wrote:
ratkins wrote:
Criterion did release Blade Runner which was co-produced by WB. (Did Criterion get the license from the Ladd Co.?)


Warner had theatrical distribution rights to Blade Runner, but not video rights. The initial VHS, Betamax, and LD editions (all pan & scan) were released by Nelson Entertainment. Then Criterion acquired the license. I don't think it was until Warner put up the money for the Director's Cut that they acquired the video rights. Even then, I think Criterion's license for the LD of the International Theatrical Version stayed with them.
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 Post subject: Re: Warner Brothers
PostPosted: 27 Apr 2014, 16:57 
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The Goonies
The Shining
The Shawshank Redemption
Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory
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 Post subject: Re: Warner Brothers
PostPosted: 04 Aug 2014, 10:50 
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phuntik915 wrote:
It could have been sweet. Here's the thing... I love Criterion, but they can be snooty, pompous asses and are getting worse as the years go by. I would bet money that they would never put out something by George Lucas. On top of that, George would probably never want to share any loot with criterion. Just my opinion.

The company that released Robocop, The Blob, The Rock, and Armageddon is snooty? I'd say the word eclectic best describes that company. Criterion has released modern mainstream Hollywood movies, classics of Hollywood's golden age, art house & foreign films, camp classics, documentaries, as well as the forgotten or rare old Hollywood movie. If they seem to be getting worse in your opinion it probably has to do with the fact that it is getting harder and harder for the company to get the rights to the Hollywood movies, due to other studios catching on to Criterion's way of producing DVDs and BDs. I'm sure if Criterion ever had the chance they would love to put out a Lucas feature on home video, especially one of the older ones like THX-1138 or American Graffiti. You can also bet that if they ever got the rights to release Star Wars it would be the original 1977 theatrical cut, and not Lucas's preferred version.
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